StyleArc Ziggi Jacket (x3)

I’ve had my eye on this pattern for a while now, but hadn’t quite pulled the trigger and bought it. I was consistantly drawn to the seamlines and versatility that comes with them – and the large variety of ways that you can play with colorblocking or mixing fabrics, as well as places to adjust fit for different fabrics without starting from scratch with new pattern pieces. When the multi-size patterns on Amazon were 25% off early/mid-October, I knew it was time to stop stalling. And, by the time I got the fitting worked out, I knew I needed more than one. This is a great, versatile pattern that, once the fit is adjusted, can be used for everything from a classic moto jacket to a short coat, to a casual jacket.

I used size 6 of the Amazon multi-size pattern, which includes sizes 4-16. I raised the armscye and made it smaller, and took a bit out of the princess seam going into the front armscye. I thought my muslin was a bit short, so I lengthened the jacket by about two inches, but when I hemmed the final version(s), I think I removed a lot of that length. I also narrowed the lapels a smidge, adjusted the collar (making it a smidge longer and narrower), and left off the decorative sleeve zippers, as I can’t stand when the zippers/buttons on sleeves clang on my desk, keyboard, etc.

I have to admit, I read the directions when I first got the pattern, and they were pretty basic. Easy to follow if you’d made jackets before, but I’d imagine not detailed enough for a beginner or someone who hasn’t made a jacket and/or zippered pockets before. I think they could have benefited from some small illustrations and found that as I was making the jacket, I referred more to the internet and other tutorials than to the instructions that came with the pattern.

1-suede-knit
This is the version I made that is most true to the pattern’s original line drawing/cover image. I used a heavy black sueded double knit, lined with a lightweight ITY knit. Even though I used a knit, I did not want to rely on the stretch of the fabric and therefore didn’t make adjustments to the base pattern pieces. For this version, I followed the suggestions in the line drawing and quilted the upper sleeve head and shoulder yoke, and also quilted the lower back piece using straight lines spaced about 3/8″ apart. I was originally planning on doing vertical zippered pockets with the same style metal zipper, but when it came time to do the pockets, I didn’t like the contrast zippers, so instead made regular in-seam pockets.

1-multicolor
For this version, I used a multicolor felted wool-look poly blend fabric (no stretch) lined with a bemberg lining. Changes that I made for this version were to cut the upper sleeve as one piece (by overlapping the seam allowances of the pattern pieces as I placed them on the fabric), leave off the upper collar and pockets, and swap out the zipper in the front closure for three small frog/knot closures.

1-grey-colorblock
This was the third jacket that I made with this pattern, but was actually the first version that I wanted to make when I bought the pattern, inspired by this White House Black Market jacket that I stumbled upon on Pinterest and fell in love with. I found this great reversible/double-sided cotton/acrylic knit, which I knew would be perfect for a not-so-in-your-face color blocked jacket. Because the fabric was two-sided and I was cutting two mirror images of most pieces, I was able to basically cut all of the pieces and work out the color blocking aspects as I sewed. The biggest changes from the base pattern that I made for this jacket were cutting the upper sleeves as one piece, adding an extra seam in the side back pieces (creating center, middle, and side back pieces like in the front so that I could mimic that color blocking), and adding another seam across the upper back for color blocking purposes. I really liked the lines created by the color blocking, so I left off the pockets so as to not disturb the lines. It is lined with the same lightweight ITY knit as the suede jacket.

Fabric Mart Mystery Bundle

With my most recent Fabric Mart purchase, I decided to do something I don’t often do and buy a mystery bundle. I chose the 6 yard bundle, then anxiously awaited my package, obsessively checking the tracking every day. When it finally arrived, I’m not sure whether I was more excited to see the fabric that I chose myself (several textured double knits for lightweight blazers and cardigans and a few ITY knits for summer tops and dresses) or the fabric that was in the mystery bundle.

My mystery bundle contained:

navy cotton jersey knit (bottom right)
heathered light greyish-tan poly jersey knit (bottom left)
a black and white floral print with a bright green border ITY knit (top)

 

 

 

For as much as I love wearing navy, I had a grand total of 0 solid navy long sleeved shirts. So, I decided to use the navy cotton knit jersey from my Fabric Mart mystery bundle to make a basic navy long sleeve shirt using my tnt knit top pattern (a heavily modified New Look 6735).

Since I wear jackets/blazers/cardigans over my tops a good 90+% of the time, I love having an interesting neckline that will “pop” under an overlayer. As I was cutting out the pieces, I noticed the edges had a tendency to curl in a kind of pretty way. I decided to make use of this, and cut and curled narrow strips to use as trim around the neckline.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My first thought when I pulled this jersey out of the box was “oh, comfy top.” The knit is a bit sheer, so I wanted to make a top that I could easily layer a tank under, if it turned out to be too sheer to wear on its own. I used Simplicty 2364 (view A), a 3/4 sleeve top with a sewn-on faux shrug detail, and supposedly a cowl neckline. Though I’ve used the pattern before and gotten a super deep cowl, somehow this time, with this fabric, I ended up with a fairly straight neckline.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have to admit that I was a bit befuddled as to what to make when I realized that the stretch in this black, white, and green floral border print meant that the border ran vertical rather than horizontal. And while I loved the floral, the green border threw me for a bit of a loop. I wanted to feature it, but didn’t want an entire green line down the length of a top or dress. First I thought about cutting the border off and reattaching it running horizontally. Then I thought about making a pair of leggings that used the green border along the side seam, but wasn’t sure I’d actually wear them enough to make them worth making. I started thinking about other patterns that I have that have interesting seams that could highlight the border print, and came up with Lekala 5883, a “sleeveless dress with bias dart.” I cut the pattern in half along the center front, so that I could place it so the border would fall on the center front and disappear as the dart and lower center front seam are sewn. I’m not a fan of sleeveless dresses, so I added small cap sleeves using the sleeve from my tnt knit top pattern.

 

 

 

Beaded Blouse – Lekala 5767

WithNeedleAndThread - Beaded Blouse

 

Several years ago, when I was first getting into sewing clothing and before I knew anything about what I was doing, I picked up two 2 yard pieces of a mystery poly blend woven fabric. It’s been sitting in my closet ever since, keeping quiet about what it really wanted to be since I rarely sew with lightweight wovens.

As soon as the first round of the Pattern Review sewing bee was announced (see the rules here – we were challenged to make a fitted blouse in about a week), this fabric started screaming at me. It wanted to be a fitted blouse with ruffles and beadwork.

I used Lekala 5767, a fitted blouse with shaping through front and back princess seams as well as darts, 3/4 length set-in sleeves, button front closure, and a collar with collar stand.

Outside of the fit of the blouse, many of the details of the blouse were inspired by a RTW Alberto Makali blouse (see inspiration and original pattern in photo below).

The pattern had a collar and collar stand, which I used as drafted in the pattern. The collar is a bit oversized, which I liked for this particular blouse as it allows the collar to stand out amongst the ruffles. However, if I were making the blouse as originally drafted, I would probably reduce the collar a bit.

I added a 1 inch ruffle (made with a straight strip of fabric with one edge finished with a serged rolled hem, then gathered to about ¾ its original length). The ruffle runs from below the collar, down the right front, around the back, and only partway up the left front, then picking up again where the left front again becomes visible (thereby reducing bulk under the overlap between the two front pieces).

I also rounded the center fronts at the lower hem level so that the ruffles would settle smoothly into place.

As a trim/finishing detail, I added 22 individually stitched beads along the inner border of the ruffle running along the right front from the lowest snap up to the collar, and again on the left front where visible along the neckline and two at the corners of the collar.

The pattern called for buttons and buttonholes, but after adding my ruffle, I opted to instead use four sew-in snaps, which I carefully stitched into the reinforced hem/ruffle seam.

I lengthened the sleeves by 1 inch, and removed the slit, and left off the tie, instead finishing my sleeve with a simple turned hem so that the focus would remain on the above-mentioned details.

All internal seams were finished with serging in the same thread as the hem of the ruffle.

 

The pattern fit well as drafted – I’ve used Lekala patterns enough to have a fairly good idea of which measurements and adjustments will give me the closest to accurate fit for different types of garments (usually not my exact measurements). I did raise the armscye for a closer fit and slightly increased range of movement.

Lekala patterns aren’t known for their instructions. However, I’ve found that since I’m not relying on the instructions for each step (and the patterns have great bones), the patterns are often great jumping-off points for making projects your own.

I basically gave the instructions a quick read-through, sewed the bodice, then ignored the instructions for the remainder of the blouse, instead relying on several online tutorials and videos for instruction on how to sew the collar/collar stand, and reminders on things such as the supposedly proper way to press a dart.

Going into this project, I thought that my biggest challenge was going to be the collar as I’d never made a collar with a stand and collar piece before – I’d made each before, but not in combination with one another.

However, it turns out that my biggest challenge was actually the ruffle that I added – first I couldn’t gather it evenly, then when I was basting it to the blouse, I caught the ruffle up in the seam in at least 5 places and had to carefully remove the stitches and re-stitch. It was more a case of my thinking it should be easy and not giving it my full attention than anything else, so lesson learned – don’t get distracted and think about what to write in your review while still sewing the blouse.

I didn’t realize it until taking pictures, but my biggest issue with the finished blouse is that the fabric shows every wrinkle every time I so much as flinch. And the fabric doesn’t breathe. At all. But that should make it a great blouse for me for fall when everyone else is still wearing t-shirts and shorts and I’m freezing.

My Uniquely You Dress Form…

…and a blazer, because the two go hand-in-hand.

I’d been wanting a dress form for a while when I found a decorative-type dress form at a discount store last year. It looked smaller than any dress form I’d seen, and seemed close to my measurements, so I grabbed it up, thinking it would be “the one.” Well, of course once I got it home and started using it, I realized that close wasn’t good enough and that it was really too big all around, but particularly in the shoulders and bust, for me to use for any sort of fitted or draped garment. It quickly became a glorified, decorative coat rack where I tossed any project that didn’t seem to be coming together the way I wanted at any given moment.

And all the while, I researched dress forms whenever I had fitting issues with a project or got tired of trying on a piece-in-progress on a million times. Lots of research showed me that most dress forms, even those in small or petite sizes, weren’t quite small enough. Despite knowing back in November/December that I was going to be budgeting all of my holiday gift money toward a dress form, I couldn’t find “the one” and didn’t make any purchases until early February.

I ended up going with a Uniquely You dress form, which came close to fitting everything on my wishlist (and a few things that I hadn’t thought to consider but love now – it’s pin-able and “steam-on-able” in addition to being small enough to fit my clothing). These dress forms consist of two parts: a foam “base” and a fabric cover (which you buy separately to suit your sizing needs). You fit the cover to yourself, then squish the foam form into the fitted cover, giving you a finished form that more-or-less mimics your body’s measurements, if not shape.

I got the petite sized form, with the size 2 cover. As many of the other reviews have shown, she does indeed come with two torpedoes (my mom was with me when I pulled her out of the box and was ready to name her Dolly). I couldn’t resist putting the cover on her immediately, just to see how it worked with no adjustments, and then let her sit like this for a few weeks while I got up the nerve to fit the cover. Of course, I didn’t take a picture of her with the cover, but did take one as soon as she came out of the box.

It took a few tries for me to get the cover/form to match my measurements, even after very snugly fitting the cover to myself. Note: this isn’t exactly how the directions say to do it, but my way seemed to make more sense to me at the time. First, it was too big all around, so I figured I must not have fit it snugly enough and took out a smidge from each of the main seams. Then it was too small all around, so I let out the side seams. At this point, it was the right size/shape through the underbust, waist, and hips, and my mom was asking me if this was really something I was enjoying as we squished the form back into the cover for what seemed like the hundredth time (and it is definitely a two person job…I would probably still be trying to get that cover zipped onto the form if I hadn’t had help). I decided that rather than risk messing up any of those measurements that now looked right, I would use an old bra and pad out the bust to get the right shape and measurements.

Uniquely You Dressform - WithNeedleAndThreadUnlike many of the reviews I read, I didn’t need to perform surgery on the torpedo boobs to get them to fit into the cover – though I have to admit that they weren’t pretty before I added the bra. Nor did I cut off the shoulders, as I have seen others do, to reduce the shoulder width. Instead, I went with a slightly less permanent fix, by sewing a band of muslin to match my shoulder measurements and using that to reduce the shoulders from about 15.5 to 14 inches.

To give the fitted, padded, and banded form a more finished/polished look, since it would be sitting out a lot of the time, I used less than a yard of super stretchy swimsuit knit to make a final cover for the form. I draped the fabric wrong side out over the form, and working in somewhat equal increments, stretched and pinned the fabric along the sideseams and shoulders/neck of the form. Then I carefully eased the pinned fabric off of the form and used the pins as a stitching guide. After sewing along the pinned lines, I flipped it right side out and put it back on the dress form, and handsewed the bottom (so it’s easily removable, which is the one thing I’d change somehow if I were making another).

As a test, I put my just-finished jacket on the dress form and took a picture. Then had my mom take a picture of me wearing the jacket so that I could compare how the jacket hung on both. And, I think it fits both of “us” pretty similarly, so I am calling project dress form a success.

Lekala 4162 Coral Blazer - WithNeedleAndThreadThe blazer is Lekala 4162, a classic princess seamed blazer with a notched lapel and single button closure, which I’ve made a few times and seems to have become my go-to pattern for both dressy and casual jackets. This one is made with a textured jacquard knit from Fabric Mart and is lined with a coral and black polka dot ITY knit, also from Fabric Mart.

I’ve worn the blazer several times between when I finished it and when I got around to writing this post, and I’ve noticed that the lapels naturally want to break slightly higher than called for in the pattern. Since the fabric doesn’t hold a crease very well, I decided to go with it and added a second button above the first.

 

Lekala 4298: My New Little Black Coat

Lekala 4298 Seamed Coat Detail - WithNeedleAndThreadSeveral weeks ago, in the middle of a small heat wave, I had the crazy desire to make a winter coat. Out of wool. Heavy, cozy, black wool. In 80+ degree weather. It was a bit of an odd time for this fabric to start speaking to me, but I decided to run with it and get a jump on my winter sewing.

I picked up this great wool fabric when it went on end-of-season clearance at FabricMart last spring, with the goal of making a classic/traditional black coat, but with no plan or pattern in mind other than knowing that I want to make just another black coat. I used Lekala 4298, a knee-ish length coat with princess seams in the back, and decorative/shaping seams in the front. I was drawn to the interesting and unique seamlines on the front of this coat, which I hoped would give a bit of subtle visual interest to a black coat (and I think it worked out exactly as I hoped).

The pattern seems to have been …inspired… by this Burberry pattern. Which apparently sold for around $3,000 when it was in stores.

The shell Lekala 4298 Seamed Coat Front - WithNeedleAndThreadof this coat is made up of eighteen pieces, six of which make up the front. None of those six pieces resemble traditional coat or jacket pattern pieces, at least none that I’ve encountered in the past. I nicknamed this my “jigsaw puzzle coat” fairly early on in the process, as working with the oddly shaped pieces was a bit like putting together a puzzle. The instructions did help with the construction order for the strangely shaped pieces, but I could have used a few diagrams in with the writing – it took me a few more tries than I care to admit to get the front of the coat correctly sewn together. After I solved the pattern piece puzzle, I colored the seam allowances of the various pieces in different colors so that I have a color coded guide for if/when I decide to sew this pattern again.

The fact that Lekala patterns are custom to your measurements gave me a great starting point on this coat, and I didn’t have to make many alterations. The only alterations I made were to raise and make smaller the armscye and narrow the sleeves.

The pattern calls for all of those fancy seams on the front to be topstitched, but seems to ignore the back of the coat (save for adding the tabbed belt piece). I decided that if I were going to be spending all the time on the seaming and topstitching on the front of the coat that the back deserved some, too, and added topstitching to the side and back seams.

I knew from my muslin that I was going to make several substantive design changes, as well, mostly do to my lack of height. I shortened the coat by several inches to get a car or walking coat length, as the original pattern’s hem fell at a funny spot on me and made me look shorter than I already am (and I aim for my clothing making me look taller, if anything). Since I shortened the pattern, I didn’t feel the need for the back vent, and left that off.Lekala 4298 Seamed Coat Back - WithNeedleAndThread

The pattern called for, if I recall correctly, seven 3/4″ to 1″ buttons on the front, not even carrying the buttons through to the hem of the coat – seven buttons all on a smidge more than half the length of the coat. Which I guess would work on a super tall model, but I thought that felt way too crowded on my coat (again – I’m short), and only used three.

I left off the huge (on me) angled pocket flaps, then went ahead and also left off the pockets themselves as I felt they broke up and distracted from the great seaming details on the front, which, to me, were the main attraction of the pattern. I contemplated adding in-seam pockets to the side seams, but decided that wasn’t the most comfortable place for pockets and then managed to convince myself that I didn’t really need pockets as I almost always have a purse with me and can shove all of my stuff in that rather than in pockets. And use gloves if it gets that cold here. But, really, where I live, the coat should keep me warm enough.

 

A New Fall Jacket: the “Moto-blazer”

WithNeedleAndThread-MotoBlazerI’d been wanting (to make) a moto/biker-style jacket for a while, buy hadn’t found a pattern that spoke to me, so the project kept getting bumped further and further down my “to make” list. Included in my list of wishes for my jacket were that it: have an asymmetrical but mostly straight zipper (versus a diagonal zipper), have an actually collar (not just the lapels), have traditional two-piece sleeves with no gussets, zippers, buttons, or extra seams, and that it be fitted rather than boxy, ideally with princess seams.

In other words, I wanted a cross between a classic moto-style jacket and a traditional blazer. Once I came to that epiphany, I decided to set about making my own “frankenpattern” (an oh so technical term for when you combine two or more different patterns to create one new pattern…think Frankenstein). I debated between several different moto jacket patterns before deciding on Simplicity 2056, which had the collar, lapels, and straight-off-center front that I had envisioned. For the blazer portion, I used Lekala 4162, a classic blazer pattern which I’ve made before and know fits well.

I traced the front of the Simplicity pattern onto the front piece of the Lekala pattern, lining up the shoulders and center fronts. When I cut the traced pattern out, I kept the center front part of the moto jacket and blended into the armscye princess seam lines of the blazer. In the photo below, the purple is the Lekala pattern, the teal is the moto jacket, and the red should be ignored (I traced two sizes of the moto jacket and ended up going with the smaller one – this is the larger one).

WithNeedleAndThread-MotoBlazer

In addition, I used the side front, side back, back, and sleeves from the Lekala pattern, and the collar and pocket pieces from the moto jacket pattern. About halfway though the project, I started calling my jacket a “moto-blazer,” and I think that name is going to stay with it.
Based on the pattern envelope images, I thought that the moto jacket collar may be too big for me, so I basted it on before sewing it for real. And it did turn out too big; I would up narrowing it by increasing the seam allowance along the back seamline, taking 1.5” from the corner, tapering to .75” at center back, then back out to 1.5” at the other corner. I probably could have made it smaller still, but decided to embrace the slightly oversized collar to give the jacket even more of a different look from the other jackets in my closet.

WithNeedleAndThread-MotoBlazerSince I had changed the fit of the moto jacket and was changing the pocket style of the blazer pattern, I added the pockets after I’d sewn most of the jacket, but before attaching the lining. This allowed me to determine the ideal length and placement of the pockets as they would fall when I was actually wearing the jacket. I think my pockets ended up being a bit smaller than a traditional pocket, but they work on me. And I don’t really intend to use the pockets for much, so going smaller with the pockets wasn’t an issue. This was the first time I’ve put zippered pockets in a jacket, and I initially found the idea of cutting a whole in my jacket slightly terrifying. Of course, in reality, it wasn’t nearly as bad as I’d built it up to be in my head and I’m glad I went ahead and put in the pockets/zippers.

After the jacket shell was mostly finished (and pockets mentioned above inserted), I decided that I really didn’t like the look of the partially exposed zipper that I was originally intending to use (the left zipper piece had no seam to be sewn into…which I hadn’t fully taken into consideration when combining my patterns as the Simplicity pattern originally called for buttons rather than a zipper on the view I used). Luckily, I had enough wiggle room (or extra ease that could be un-eased) that I was able to taper the top edge of the zipper tape, and fold the jacket fabric over the edge of the zipper tape to create a faux-seam. If/when I make this pattern again, I’d probably draft a real seam into the pattern here as I like this look much better than the exposed zipper look.

The fabric is a wool blend coating that I got from Fabric.com a few years ago. Though it’s hard to see in my pictures, it is a blend of cream/tan, olive, purple, and mustard yellow threads. I lined the jacket with purple Bemberg lining.

Zipper issues aside, I am happy with the way my new “moto-blazer” turned out and am now anxiously waiting for the weather to cool down enough so that I can wear my new jacket.

 

A Closetful of Jeans

Over the past few months, I’d noticed that despite having many pair of jeans, I was drawn to the same 2 or 3 pairs of jeans everyday, and I had been running into problems figuring out what to wear when all three pairs were in the wash. When I stopped to think about it, I realized that all three pairs were jeans that I’d made, and that I had no intention of wearing the closet-full of store bought jeans for anything other than yard work or puttering around the house. Partially inspired by the great timing of Pattern Review’s One Pattern, Many Looks contest, I decided to donate all of the old jeans that I hadn’t been wearing and replace them with better-fitting, me-made jeans.

The One Pattern, Many Looks contest challenges you to use one pattern to make 2 or more different garments without making any substantive changes to the pattern itself. The goal is to use different fabrics, trims, embellishments, etc. to create a variety of different looks without needing to go through the fitting and alterations process for each item. For the contest, in the case of self-drafted patterns such as my jeans, the first pair made counts as the base pattern, which determines what you can and cannot change in subsequent versions. In preparation for me jeans-making spree, I tweaked my base jeans pattern a bit, adjusting the grainlines, rise, and pocket curve. Because my pattern is for stretch denim, and each stretch denim stretches differently, I had been basting each pair together, tweaking for fit, making note of the correct seam allowances and where needed deviating from the norm, and then carefully un-stitching everything before sewing them up for real. With the first pair that I made for the contest, I changed my construction order, making it easier to adjust the fit with less seam-ripping.

I used my tnt jeans pattern, which I made a few years ago using Kenneth King’s Craftsy class, and tweak for fit every few months. I ended up making 5 pairs of jeans during the month that this contest ran.

This pair is a medium-weight stretch denim from FabricMart Fabrics. If I remember correctly, it was Marc Jacobs fabric. The back of the fabric is primarily white, and I thought about doing some sort of color blocking to play up the reversibility of the denim, but decided to stick with the more classic, solid color and subtle tone-on-tone topstitching. Since they were pretty basic once sewn, I decided to add a bit of embroidery to the back pockets, and a second decorative button and loop (non-functioning, purely decorative) to the front to give them a bit more personality without making them too casual.

I’ve never been a huge fan of the classic bright gold on dark denim look on jeans, so for my take on “classic, dark wash jeans”, I went with a goldish-brown for my topstitching and the embroidery on the back pockets. The ‘contrast’ stitching became a bit less contrast and more subtle after the first run through the wash, and I’m hoping it doesn’t lose any more brightness in the future. Other than that, they are pretty much your standard jeans, without the coin pocket (which I’ve never seen the point of and rarely put on any of my jeans). The denim is a medium-weight stretch denim that I got more than a year ago from FabricMart Fabrics.

Since my attempt at a dark wash jean with contrast stitching sort of flopped, I decided to go with a definite contrast for this pair, in an effort to make a more casual pair of jeans. I ‘auditioned’ a variety of colors on a scrap of fabric before settling on two lines of stitching for most topstitched seams: a thick white thread closest to the seam and two strands of blue variegated threads for the second row. I used the bolder of the two variegated threads for the embroidery on the back pockets. With the exception of the back pockets, the fabric/thread combination isn’t quite as ‘in your face’ as I had expected, and I like the finished product a lot more than I expected.

Made with Black Bebe Diagonal Twill-Weave Knit from FabricMart, this is my take on the jeggings/yoga pant craze that seems to be sweeping the nation. After basting most of the pants together to see how much I had to adjust due to using a knit rather than a woven (turns out, not at all with this fabric), I realized that these actually slightly resembled slacks rather than jeans. So, following that thought, I left off the back patch pockets, changed the front pockets to slash pockets rather than the classic jeans pocket curve, and eliminated some of the classic jeans topstitching. The stretch of this fabric also allowed me to eliminate the traditional zippered/button fly for a faux fly and make pull-on, elastic waist pants. For the elastic waistband, I used my regular contour waistband pattern piece, and added a narrow strip of elastic to the top seam. Since it was elastic waist, I also left off the belt loops for a smoother fit.

Inspired by these buttons, I decided to make something a little more fun than a standard black jean with black stitching, and went with a medium-weight charcoal black denim, light grey-blue contrast stitching with a hint of shine (embroidery thread). To further show off the buttons, I added buttoned flaps to the back pockets. Well, really faux flaps, as I like the look of flapped/buttoned pockets, but in reality like my pockets to be easily accessible and get frustrated when I have to unbutton a pocket to slip my phone in. I sewed the flaps first, then serged the top edge of the flap into the facing of the pocket so that I would maintain the look of a separate flap, but would have an open pocket. The button goes through both the flap and the patch pocket but not through the back of the jeans.