Slow Learning: Simplicity 1613

I’m slowly discovering that what I’ve read on other blogs about the big pattern companies’ sizing is true: they put way too much ease in knit garments. And apparently, I’m a slow learner. It took another botched muslin for me to decide that maybe I should just start with a size 8 in knit patterns from the big 4. Last week, I made what I thought would be a wearable version of Simplicity 1613. Well, turns out, I made a not-so-wearable garment.
According to the envelope, I’m in-between a size 10 and 12. Since this is a knit, I went down to the 10, and foolishly assumed it would just fit. Several hours later, all I had to show for my time was a pile of white fabric. This pattern has a lot of pieces. And most of them have to be put together before the shirt really comes together. When I first looked at all of the pattern pieces, I had no clue how they would all fit together in the end. Even as I was sewing, I couldn’t ‘see’ the final garment. I finally had to disengage my brain and follow the directions one step at a time. Sure enough, all of the pieces fit together fine.

The final piece looks like the pattern photo. The only issue I had while putting it together, other than needing to read the instructions and sew with no distractions to put the twist together, came with the way the front V sits. Instead of a pretty V, my facing is flipping outward, creating a bit of a ripply curve.
Although the shirt looks great (other than the V), the fit is not so great. The shirt is just all around too big. It mostly fits in the sides, but the shoulders and neckline need some work. The lowest cutout falls way below anywhere that I consider socially acceptable. There must be too much fabric in the front, because the cut outs droop and bunch together, rather than looking like pretty triangles like in the envelope photo. It looks good on a hanger though, so I’ll trim the threads and add it to my giveaway pile. And try again in a smaller size, because I still like the pattern.
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